Always note-worthy, that Arthur. March 2013, Manhattan.
Below is a post-theater email exchange with one of my favorite English professors from college. Arthur, as you may recall, was an English professor himself.
Laura: I saw Much Ado About Nothing last night. Benedick was phenomenal! Beatrice, too. What a fun, lively production. What did you think?
Professor: So glad you went to see Much Ado… The theatre was so intimate and the performances (particularly Benedick and Beatrice) so animated. I loved the way Benedick talked to the audience; I think this is the way Shakespeare is meant to be seen. Where were your seats? We were in the corner by the front exit.
Laura: We were in the left corner, too! Arthur’s wheelchair spot was ground-level, so the wedding dresses swished right past him. It felt like we were a part of the play. And yes, Benedick’s soliloquies! Loved how he engaged with the audience. He and Beatrice both did that in their “overhearing” parts, too. Arthur, a retired English prof, said “Nothing” in the title also could have been pronounced as “Noting,” or listening. Is that why the ear was on the Playbill? (Arthur has dementia… Must Google when I get home!)
Professor: No, he’s exactly right! It is pronounced “Much Ado about Not[h]ing.” It’s good to know that dementia doesn’t destroy your knowledge of Shakespeare!

Always note-worthy, that Arthur. March 2013, Manhattan.

Below is a post-theater email exchange with one of my favorite English professors from college. Arthur, as you may recall, was an English professor himself.

Laura: I saw Much Ado About Nothing last night. Benedick was phenomenal! Beatrice, too. What a fun, lively production. What did you think?

Professor: So glad you went to see Much Ado… The theatre was so intimate and the performances (particularly Benedick and Beatrice) so animated. I loved the way Benedick talked to the audience; I think this is the way Shakespeare is meant to be seen. Where were your seats? We were in the corner by the front exit.

Laura: We were in the left corner, too! Arthur’s wheelchair spot was ground-level, so the wedding dresses swished right past him. It felt like we were a part of the play. And yes, Benedick’s soliloquies! Loved how he engaged with the audience. He and Beatrice both did that in their “overhearing” parts, too. Arthur, a retired English prof, said “Nothing” in the title also could have been pronounced as “Noting,” or listening. Is that why the ear was on the Playbill? (Arthur has dementia… Must Google when I get home!)

Professor: No, he’s exactly right! It is pronounced “Much Ado about Not[h]ing.” It’s good to know that dementia doesn’t destroy your knowledge of Shakespeare!